- Anzeige -


  • Mixed outcomes for plants and animals in warmer 2080s climate
    [NEWS] More than three quarters of plants and animals in England are likely to be significantly affected by climate change by the end of the century, say researchers. Researchers showed that given a 2°C increase in average global temperature by the 2080s, 54% of 3000 species in England could significantly expand their populations into different areas of the country, where climate suitability is increasing, if they are able to get to those locations. The team, whic…
  • Conserve intact forest landscapes to maximize biodiversity, reduce extinction risk
    [NEWS] CORVALLIS, Ore. — A new global analysis of forest habitat loss and wildlife extinction risk published July 19 in the journal Nature shows that species most at risk live in areas just beginning to see the impacts of human activities such as hunting, mining, logging and ranching. The researchers argue that these intact areas deserve higher priority for limited conservation dollars than areas already impacted heavily by human activity even though species are also threat…
  • Destruction of wetlands linked to algal blooms in Great Lakes
    [NEWS] Canada's current wetland protection efforts have overlooked how the environment naturally protects fresh-water resources from agricultural fertilizer contaminants, researchers from the University of Waterloo have found. In a recent study, engineering researchers at Waterloo found that small wetlands have a more significant role to play than larger ones in preventing excess nutrients like nitrogen and phosphorus from fertilizer from reaching waterbodies such as the Great La…
  • Scientists name new species of dinosaur after Canadian icon
    [NEWS] IMAGE: This is a life recreation of Albertavenator curriei.  Credit: Illustrated by Oliver Demuth. © Oliver Demuth TORONTO, July 17, 2017 - Scientists from the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) and the Philip J Currie Dinosaur Museum …
  • Fossil site shows impact of early Jurassic's low oxygen oceans
    [NEWS] IMAGE: Before the low oxygen period, bivalves were larger and more numerous.  Credit: The University of Texas at Austin/Rowan Martindale Using a combination of fossils and chemical markers, scientists have tracked how a period of globally low ocean-oxygen…


- Anzeige -


Abonnieren:

Empfehlen: